Different faiths celebrate together

Many religions celebrate holidays in April. Photo by McCartney Walsh / Jambar contributor

By McCartney Walsh

On a diverse campus like Youngstown State University, it is important in the month of April when many holidays overlap that students are given equal opportunities to practice and share their faith. Those of the Islamic, Christian and Jewish faiths will celebrate holidays this month.

Ramadan is a religious holiday celebrated by Muslims which lasts the whole month of April. Layali Kusuni, a sophomore biology pre-med major and the president and founder of the Muslim Student Association, spoke on the organization’s plans for the holiday.

“April 2 to May 2 is the Islamic holy month Ramadan,” Kusuni said. “We are planning all of these fun events to get students on campus involved and also spread awareness by educating non-Muslims on our holy month and holiday.”

According to Kusuni, there will be different booths set up on campus each day in which students can participate to spread awareness and understanding about the Islamic community. A big part of Ramadan is fasting. 

“The goal of our Fast-A-Thon is to not only raise money for charity, but also to allow non-Muslims to experience a day of fasting and seeing all of the different things we do during the month of Ramadan,” Kusuni said. “It will be a great experience to learn something and join in on all of the fun, all while raising money for a good cause.”

To participate in the Fast-A-Thon, nonmembers are asked to contribute between $10-20. 

Christians celebrate Holy Week, culminating in Easter on April 17. Allyson Conner, Coalition for Christian Outreach president and senior primary intervention specialist education major, said the Easter season has great meaning to those of the Christian faith.

“Good Friday is a day that churches gather together and remember Jesus being put to death on the cross. Three days later comes Easter, which is the day Jesus rose from the grave and beat sin and death,” Conner said. “We celebrate that as believers because he beat sin and death and that means that we have a savior who is alive and loves us.”

The YSU CCO chapter is part of a national organization which allows college students to connect and grow in their faith, as well as accept and teach their faith to others.

“You don’t have to sign up you just show up and you are welcomed and you are loved regardless of what religion you are,” Conner said. “We have students from many different religious backgrounds who come and worship and are not turned away.”

CCO strives to provide opportunities for students to convene, learn and share their own experiences at weekly meetings on Mondays, along with small groups on campus throughout April. 

The Jewish holiday of Passover begins at sundown April 15, associate professor of political science Adam Fuller said.

“Passover is a seven-day Jewish holiday every spring that commemorates the ancient exodus of the Israelites out of Egypt. The Israelites were slaves under the domination of the Egyptian pharoah,” Fuller said. “We Jews believe that God performed many great miracles to help Moses lead our ancestors out of slavery in Egypt, such as the 10 plagues.”

There are many opportunities near campus for Jewish students to celebrate Passover at local synagogues.

“We have many Passover traditions, including a special dinner on the first night called a Seder,” Fuller said. “All local synagogues are holding Seders. Jewish families have them in their homes and invite guests over for them.”

With such a diverse group of people on YSU’s campus, it is important to encourage and let those differences flourish here, according to Fuller, giving everyone an equal and safe opportunity to express and teach their religions.

“Freedom of religion is one of the most important rights we have as Americans,” Fuller said. “It is also important as a college campus that all religions have their customs and traditions supported because as an educational institution, we have an obligation to help each other learn about other cultures and ideas.”

 

 

 

 

***** see calendar below*****

Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

 

 

 

 

 

1. CCO Small groups 10-11 a.m. Pollock Room in Kilcawley

2. Ramadan Begins 

3.

4. CCO Small groups 10-11 a.m. Pollock Room in Kilcawley


CCO weekly meeting 3:30- 5 p.m. Steel Valley Church

 

5.

6.

7. CCO small groups 8:30-9:30 a.m. Pollock Room in Kilcawley

8. CCO Small groups 10-11 a.m. Pollock Room in Kilcawley

9.

10.

Christian Holy Week Begins

11.

CCO Small groups 10-11 a.m. Pollock Room in Kilcawley

 

MSA Create your own Tasbih (Prayer) Beads

In Lariccia Cultural Laboratory in Jones Hall

From 2-5 p.m.

 

CCO weekly meeting 3:30-5 p.m. Steel Valley Church

 

12.

MSA First Annual MSA Fast-A-Thon Iftar in DeBartolo Stadium Club from 7:45-10 p.m. (contact MSA about fees)

13.

MSA Try on a Hijab Booth

outside or in Kilcawley weather permitting from 12-3 p.m.

14.

MSA Suhoor, early breakfast at IHOP in Boardman at 4:30 a.m.

 

CCO small groups 8:30-9:30 a.m. Pollock Room in Kilcawley

15. CCO Small groups 10-11 a.m. Pollock Room in Kilcawley

 

MSA Religious discussion and Ice Cream

 Passover Begins

All local synagogues are holding Seders for the first night of Passover, each location varies

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17.

18. CCO Small groups 10-11 a.m. Pollock Room in Kilcawley

 

CCO weekly meeting 3:30-5 p.m. Steel Valley Church

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20.

21.

CCO small groups 8:30-9:30 a.m. Pollock Room in Kilcawley

22. CCO Small groups 10-11 a.m. Pollock Room in Kilcawley

23.

24.

25. CCO Small groups 10-11 a.m. Pollock Room in Kilcawley

 

CCO weekly meeting 3:30-5 p.m. Steel Valley Church

 

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27.

28.

CCO small groups 8:30-9:30 a.m. Pollock Room in Kilcawley

29. CCO Small groups 10-11 a.m. Pollock Room in Kilcawley

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